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PBS
Dec 18, 2012 12:00am PST
from our studios captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tonight our focus is on what can be done so that the tragedy at sandy hook elementary school does not happen again. on friday december 14th a gunman killed 26 people, 20 of them were children between the ages of 6 and 7. it is the second deadliest mass shooting in american history. the killings have revived the debate on gun control and demonstrated the need to rethink our approach to mental illness. president obama traveled to the bereaved town to attend a community vigil and console families. here is a part of the president's address to the grieving people of that town, and to the nation. >> no single law, no set of laws can eliminate evil or prevent every senseless act of violence in our society but that can't an excuse for inaction. surely we did:do better than this. if there's even one step we can take to save another child or another parent or another town, from the grief that's visited tucson, aurora, and oak creek and newtown, and communities from columb
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 12:00pm PST
over the country and new york city also and they give us -- >> rose: everybody here has a passion for food, fair? you could not be the best -- >> yes. >> rose: and is there a passion to please? >> absolutely. if you don't this passion forget it, don't go in this work. >> rose: man, man, man, man. why? >> well, it was tradition, i'm trying to change the tradition now. it's changing slowly. i think if you go into their kitchens you'll see women and they're coming up through the ranks. >> rose: you see more and more female chefs in the kitchen? >> yes, and they work very, very hard, as hard as a man. when they become a chef the pressure might be a little bit too hard you become a chef when you're 30 or around that age and a woman may want to get married or have children so it scrambles a bit the career. >> but that's not always the case. (laughter) >> rose: i know this sounds naive. do you cook every meal? are you there just watching? >> i watch. i cook many of them but definitely we have a lot of help. >> rose: but just the main course -- >> i work at station with the fish. >> rose:
PBS
Dec 17, 2012 7:00pm PST
confident there will be a deal on the fiscal cliff in janaury. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: from grandma's cookies to holiday gifts for the little ones, still ahead we're riding along with u.p.s. as the shipping giant kicks off its busiest week of the year. >> tom: two mildly encouraging words were used by a group of economists to describe what next year may bring: stable and moderate. that's the 2013 outlook from the national association of business economics. the organization figures the u.s. economy will grow 2.1%, driven by housing and construction, but with corporate profit growth slowing down. nayantara hensel is the chairman of the national association for business economics. not bad, moderate, stable but certainly not robust here s it? >> no, that's absolutely right, tom. basically again we're forecasting annual average real gdp growth at 2.1% but the good news is we expect it to accelerate during the course of the year, perhaps reach being 3% by the fourth quarter of 2014. >> tom: what is going to add to that growth considering, is it being held back in the first s
PBS
Dec 20, 2012 1:00am PST
of the fiscal cliff was a big topic at an investor conference in new york today hosted by johnson controls. this wisconsin-based industrial conglomerate is a leading provider of products to make buildings energy efficient, and it's also the world's largest maker of car batteries and automotive seats. c.e.o. stephen roell told me he's worried that uncertainty about the fiscal cliff could hurt consumer confidence, and his business. >> we don't do that. as the consumer, i products to costumers like the big three, that in turn sell to the auto industry. my biggest concern is how it will affect the psychology of the consumer. i've been surprised, susie, that people continue to buy automobiles. but my fear is that could change dramatically. >> susie: steve, to what extent are the ups and downs impacting your business day to day. >> i think people are holding back on making captain investments. i see that particularly in the building side. from my standpoint, i continue to invest around the world. i'll invest to make sure i'm buying the strategies we laid up for the next three years. the
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 4:00pm PST
try to avert the fiscal cliff. >>> the past year has been a record year for new york with less murders than any time than in the past 15 years. mayor michael bloomberg said there were just over 400 homicides in 2012, 100 less than in the previous year. one man knows a lot about that subject, new york city's deputy police commissioner, paul brown, who joins us live right now. mr. brown, congratulations. how have you done it? >> thank you, mainly through 35,000 men and women in uniform, but particularly through something called operation at attack where we send as many uniformed police officers as possible into areas where we have seen spikes and violence, particularly shootings. >> that sounds almost like a back to basics campaign. why was the decision taken to go in that direction? >> well, it started with mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly coming into the office right after 9/11 with a deep downturn in the economy, less tax revenue. we lost 6000 police officers through attrition, we have 6000 fewer now than we had then. that forced us to take a look at how we deploy office
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 12:00am PST
our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: andy warhol is considered by many to be the most important artist of the 21st century, though critics and artist debate the meaning of his work, few question his impact on contemporary art. this is the subject of of the metropolitan musician exhibition called "regarding warhol: 60 artists, 50 years." it showcases 45 works by warhol alongside 1200 works by 60 other artists influenced by him. joining me are two curators, mark rosenthal and marla prather. also are three of the artists featured in the show: jeff koons john currin and my good friend chuck close. i'm pleased to have all of them here at this table. let me start with you, mark. somebody once said to me great books begin with a question. do great exhibitions begin with a question? >> well, that's what i hope. the question here is, is andy warhol the most impactful artist? >> rose: impactful rather than important? >> i prefer that. i prefer that because i think of his effect being like a meteor hitting the earth and changing climactic conditions, changing river be
PBS
Dec 21, 2012 1:00am PST
venerable big board? erika miller reports. >> reporter: the new york stock exchange has been the symbol of capitalism for nearly two centuries, but now it wants to give up its independence and be bought by a little-known rival in atlanta. the intercontinental exchange, or "ice" for short, was started 12 years ago as an energy trading platform. since then, the exchange has evolved into an internet-based marketplace trading futures, options, and derivatives. the reason it wants to buy the n.y.s.e. is not the plain vanilla stock trading business. the jewel in the deal is a division called "liffe," a leading futures and options exchange. it's based in london and drives over 40% of n.y.s.e. profits. >> it has a business that deals, for instance, in financial derivatives. these are derivatives contracts tied to financial products like interest rates, and ice has been wanting to expand in that direction for a while. >> reporter: as for the n.y.s.e., it's no secret that this year has been a tough one for the stock trading business. in addition, fewer companies are going public, so the i.p.o. ma
PBS
Dec 15, 2012 12:00am PST
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. it is estimated that one in five american veterans in these wars suffer from severe depression or post traumatic stress disorder. retired lieutenant colonel john o blin is one of them. he served four tours in iraq and surrounding persian gulf as well as three tours on the-- tours on the border of israel and egypt, awarded the bronze star, purple heart and kbrat action badge among other commendationses. he joins me tonight to talk about his life, also joining me an extraordinary group of scien titss, mary stein from california san diego, lisa shin from tufts university, kerry russler from emory university, joann difede from cornell and my cohost is dr. eric kandel. a noubl lawyer yet, professor at columbia university and a howard hughes medical investigator. i am pleased to have all of them here this evening at this table. which begin as we always do talking to eric kandel. what are we doing this evening. >> post traumatic stress disorder. this is a fascinating disorder. and it is unique in psychiatry. it is perh
PBS
Dec 13, 2012 1:00am PST
foundation. the organization provides funds to about 200 non-profits in the new york area which work directly with sandy relief. bob ottenhoff is the president and c.e.o. of the center for disaster philanthropy. >> most giving to disasters occurs in the first month, but as we now know with sandy the challenges to relief to disasters go on for a long period of time. so we're still going to need lots of charitable contributions for the recovery and rebuilding period. >> reporter: the red cross has already raised $188 million for sandy relief and expects to use more than half of that by the end of the month. but with every disaster, there are always some bad actors. new york state has been at the forefront of holding non-profits accountable. the state attorney general has asked more than 75 charities to show where their sandy relief donations are going. >> these scammers tend to take advantage of people in emotional situations, when they're very concerned about things like disaster relief, and will respond to an ad or an email without really taking the extra step of checking. >> reporte
PBS
Dec 12, 2012 12:00am PST
our captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: british period dramas have long held a special fascination for american television audiences, upstairs, downstairs, pride and prejudice have been released to widespread attention and praise, downton abbey anybody the most successful and the latest, oscar-winning prize winner julian fellows already won six emmys and legions on fans on both sides of the pond. it is back on pbs in january and here is a teaser for the third season. >> from war and peace downton abbey still stands. >> no one must know. >> i am warning you. >> rose: joining me now, four of the stars, hugh bonneville, plays lord granderson familiar. >> elizabeth mcgovern. >> lady grantham. >> jim carter plays the butler and joanne greg plays anna, the head house made, i am proud to have all of you here. >> let me start and go around and tell me where you left your character and what to expect this year. >> the end of season 2. >> robert was relieved that the war and the spanish flu had deserted at long last an
PBS
Dec 19, 2012 7:00pm PST
its own. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: our "nbr-u" partners at wharton have new research showing how accounting for government loan guarantees, like the one given to g.m., is impacting uncle sam's bottom line. you can learn more on the web, just head to: www.nbr.com and look for the "nbr-u" tab. >> tom: look for the dirt two fly in coming months. permits to build new homes in the u.s. shot up to more than a four-year high last month as actual home building slowed down a bit. housing starts fell 3% in november from the month before, but it has been a strong recovery, compared to a year ago, housing starts up 21.6%. the building permit, jumping 3.6% in november, up to their highest level since july 2008. martin connor is the chief financial officer, and he joins us tonight from pennsylvania. marty, welcome back to n.b.r. have you been out there increasing your building permit for next year? >> tom, it is great to be with n.b.r. i do think we are increasing our permits. we've seen dramatic increases in our sales through the first four quarters of our year, all four
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 4:00pm PST
york. the governor of new york state has called what happened in at the small town a senseless act of violence. it comes just 10 days after a shooting killed 26 people at a connecticut primary school. a report from washington. >> a fire in the early morning in a comfortable lakeside community. the phone call that brought forth small town firefighters to the blaze, and out of nowhere, a tragedy on christmas eve. >> all four firefighters were shot at the scene. one firefighter was able to flee the scene on his own, and the other three were p&l in the location. >> two firefighters died of their wounds at the fire, and it took an armored personnel carrier to evacuate residents. the town is distraught. >> it is a very difficult situation. >> a heightened awareness to this kind of violence in light of what happened in connecticut, and i just want everyone to remember that it is christmas eve. we have families who are in pain and crisis today. >> all week, they have been burying the dead in newtown, connecticut, and all week, the argument over the kind of guns available in america and the
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 7:00pm PST
, nbr, new york. >> susie: when it comes to new claims for jobless benefits, the effects of super storm sandy appear to be passing. new claims fell by 25,000 in the week ending december 1 to a lower than expected 370,000 requests. that's raising hopes about november's jobs data, which is due out tomorrow. grey, and christmas says u.s. employment firm challenger, grey, and christmas says u.s. companies announced 57,000 job cuts last month. separately, the number of planned job cuts rose 20% in november from october's levels. on wall street, the dow rose 39 points, but the nasdaq added 15, the s&p up nearly five. >> reporter: i'm erika miller in new york. coming up tonight, we'll talk to the c.e.o. of kitchen store sur la table and get his outlook for holiday sales. >> tom: lots of theatrics today, but few visible signs of progress in washington towards a fix for the fiscal cliff. the only hopeful sign is that republicans and democrats are talking privately again. but they haven't worked out any of the big issues, including what to do about the nation's debt limit. washington will hit its
PBS
Dec 15, 2012 2:00am PST
york times," martha raddatz of abc news, and john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factory. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we've been there for our client through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years from insurance to investment management, from real estate to retirement solutions, we developed new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. this rock has never stood still. and that's one thing that will never change. prudential. >> additional corpor
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 3:00pm PST
. to the northeast, more than a foot of snow was expected from new york state to maine. by last night, it was already on the way. >> the winds were fierce it was blowing the cars around and you could see the semi's were swerving. >> ifill: the storm also forced cancellation of hundreds of flights and the ripple effects reached as far west as san francisco. >> after i found out my flight had been canceled after four hours of waiting in the airport, i had to wait another three hour customer service line, which i didn't even get to the end of before the booth closed. >> ifill: about a 1,000 people spent christmas night on cots at dallas/fort worth international airport. by dawn, patience was wearing thin. one fed-up pilot apologized to his passengers over the loudspeaker, after they were forced to wait on the tarmac for almost five hours. >> ifill: by this evening, the worst of the weather was moving into new england. but in its wake, nearly 200,000 customers had lost power across the southeast and midwest, making home for the holidays unexpectedly cold and dark. >> warner: still t
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 7:00pm PST
spending will top a trillion dollars within five years. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: using your phone for shopping, is just one of the ways you will use your cell phone in the coming year. as processing power gets bigger and the physical size gets smaller, companies are using that mobile technology to make products you use every day smarter as well. as ruben ramirez reports, those are two of the top tech trends we'll see in 2013. >> reporter: people use smartphones to play games, watch movies and keep up with social media, but for many the mobile phone will become a bigger part of their lives in the coming year. trendwatchers call it the mobile fingerprint or a smartphone as unique as your fingerprint. no need to type in passwords, your phone tells your computer its you, and then locks the screen when you step away. on the health front there's technology to let a smartphone help diabetics measure their glucose levels. and with retailers, going mobile means more than processing payments. >> we do something very specific which is not just focus on the mechanics of paym
PBS
Dec 18, 2012 4:00pm PST
family fled to japan. but in new york at the epicenter of new technology and ideas, that eventually became his home. and at a time when people were not expected to interact with technology, he invited participation. >> we have his random access, which shows the artist having read -- the constructed a real to real audio decker he invites the audience to interact with the trucks on our own with the device. >> why did he do this? and how is it relevant today? >> he was the first artist to the construct technology and give it back to west. it is a metaphor for what we're going through today with the internet and the technology that we deal with on a day-to-day basis. >> he knew that television would change the world. and his art embraces it, sometimes playfully, sometimes obscure. he defined a new visual medium that is now at the center of our to the 21st century. he was really the first person to use technology in ways that today, we take for granted. he predicted the power of television, how electronic media could bring us all together, and what you see here are his ideas. decades lat
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 4:00pm PST
bbc.com/news. >> funding of this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. - i love strawberries! and today we're going to the enchanted garden to pick some! and then we're going to learn how crayons are made at the crayon factory! i'm so glad you're coming with us! be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future t
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 4:00pm PST
mexico. it will bring more rain and snow, this time washington and new york could be hit as well. >> a wicket when to remix is wreaking havoc on the nation's midsection. -- a wicked winter remix is wreaking havoc on the nation's midsection. this has ruined plans for tens of thousands. the national weather service says the heaviest the commissions will be in northern pennsylvania. and parts of the northeast, they are taking the snow in stride. >> i love it. this is part of living in new england. >> standard new england weather. >> this is mostly bringing heavy rain and strong winds of up to 70 miles per hour. this is causing more problems for travelers. at least 355 have been cancelled today. in the last 24 hours, it has been more than 2400. power was knocked out from texas to vermont. people in ohio are trying to clean up the mess. from texas to alabama, at least 34 tornadoes touched down. today, people are picking up the debris. the death toll from the winter storm has risen. so far, at least nine people have been killed. >> there are police everywhere. >> police are cautioning driver
PBS
Dec 18, 2012 7:00pm PST
more market share, it would be samsung. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: another nick to toyota's reputation. the automaker is paying a record fine, more than $17 million, for failing to promptly report safety defects related to a lexus recall. this is the second time since 2010 that toyota has paid fines for not properly reporting vehicle defects to u.s. regulators. toyota once had the best reputation for quality and safety, but in the last three years it has announced numerous recalls for separate investigations into sticky pedals, poorly designed floor mats and steering rod problems. >> susie: big changes coming to pfizer. the giant drug maker plans to cut about 20% of its u.s. sales force, or 600 jobs. according to a report from bloomberg, the cuts begin this month and are said to be part of c.e.o. ian read's strategy to reposition pfizer after losing patent protection on its top selling drug, lipitor. at its peak, that cholesterol drug generated revenues of nearly $10 billion a year for pfizer. while lipitor's loss was tough for pfizer, it was a boon for generic drug
PBS
Dec 12, 2012 4:00pm PST
harrison's concert for bangladesh in new york. he preferred to keep his distance. >> i could have made billions by now, but i never thought of that. i wanted to keep the sanctity of music. >> two of his daughters became musicians. the jazz singer nora jones and a sitar player like her father. >> what is great about my relationship with him is we have a father daughter relationship. we have a teacher and student relationship and are also musical collaborators and perform together, so it is a very tight-knit, very close relationship. >> he was a man for whom music was part of an oral tradition handed down from two route to route. -- from guru to guru. and art with which she inspired musicians for 70 years. >> he died at the age of 92. he will be missed by music lovers around the world. that brings the program to a close. you can get updates on our web site. if you would like to reach me, you can follow me on a switcher. i will see you tomorrow. -- on twitter. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation o
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 7:00pm PST
tonight in new york. sydney, nice to see you and welcome. you have four of the worst c.e.o.'s of the year, beginning with number 4, mark pincus, manager of zynga that relies on facebook for its success. what brought mark to your list. >> facebook and zynga announced they would go their separate ways and no longer be tied in and you can guess who that will affect more, facebook or zynga. one executive manager after another has left and that is always something i have seen as one of the reason warnings signs of something going wrong. along the way acquisition was made for $180 millujjy didn't take them more than half a year to write down 50% of the value of that acquisition. so it really look like a company that is floundering and mark pincus along the way ended out cashing out as quickly as possible raising eye browse in the possible. >> to the makeup industry and fashion. andrea young, the former c.e.o. of avon, still the chairman. this company rejected a buy outr offer earlier in the year when the share price was closeƑi to 3 where it is now. is that why she is on the list. >>
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm PST
, he'd really like that-- and a little for myself, too. >> reporter: erika miller, nbr, new york. >> susie: don't let the fiscal cliff scare you away from buying stocks. that's the advice to investors from andy cross, the chief investment officer at the motley fool. tom hudson recently spoke with him, and began by asking if the s&p 500 will be higher or lower this time next year. >> that's a tough question. i'm not in the job of picking the stocks over, you know, three, six, nine, even 12 months is tough for me. here's what i do think. i do think we'll get some resolution to the fiscal cliff, whether it's right now or whether it's soon after the new year, i think we will see some kind of resolution. that will be good for markets, good for business, good for investors. so i'm going into 2013 wanting to be long some really good high quality companies that i know can accrue returns for investors over time. and i don't want to think with the next few months. >> tom: let's focus on the next year ahead. what about volatility, do you think you'll need an iron stomach to be a stock investor? >> i
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 6:00pm PST
forbes.com and former detroit bureau chief for the "new york times," and by bill ballenger, editor of "inside michigan politics." welcome to you both. mickey maynard. first, this has all happened very quickly. what precipitated this right now. >> there were two things that happened, judy. first of all in november there was a ballot proposal that unions floated that would have outlawed right-to-work. it would have put that into the state constitution. that proposal failed because it was proposed at the same time as a lot of constitutional amendments. people just sort of cast one vote against all of them. the second thing that happened was republicans gave up some seats in the house and senate. it will still be a republican majority in january but it will be smaller. if right-to-work was going to happen this lame duck republican-controlled legislature was where it was going to happen. >> woodruff: bill, in a state that voted by ten points for president obama in november, it's a state that is striking a blow for right-to-work. how do you explain that? >> there was a mixeded result on nov
PBS
Dec 1, 2012 12:00am PST
studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> we shall go on to the end. we shall fight in france. we shall fight on the seas and oceans. we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air. we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. we shall fight on the beaches. we shall fight on the landing grounds. we shall fight in the fields and in the streets. we shall fight in the hills. we shall never surrender. >> rose: winston church sill recognized as one of the greatest statesmen of all times. in 1954 edward r. murrow the cbs newsman said he mobilized the english language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an exhi business here at
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 3:00pm PST
from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arrive ted white house this afternoon for their first group meeting with the president since november 16th. vice president biden and treasury secretary timothy geithner also attend. but there was little to suggest the makings of an 11th hour bargain. a source familiar with the meeting told the newshour its president is sticking with his offer from last friday. it included keeping the bush era tax br
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 3:00pm PST
may be changing. the "new york times" reports that the russians had agreed to a new strategy to persuade president assad to step down. for more on all of this, we turn to dimitri simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at s
PBS
Dec 8, 2012 1:00am PST
. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: with the fiscal cliff about three weeks away, washington hasn't made much progress to avoid it. that was the assessment from one of those directly involved: house speaker john boehner. the top republican today accused president obama of, "slow walking", the economy to the edge of the cliff. he repeated his call for the president to send congress a plan that can pass both houses of congress. tax rates are the major sticking point. the president wants to raise them for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the economy prett
PBS
Dec 14, 2012 1:00am PST
% by the end of next year. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> tom: still ahead, could legalized recreational marijuana use become the new competitor for medical dope? we speak with the c.e.o. of marijuana products maker dixie elixirs. >> susie: american consumers did a bit of shopping in november after laying low the month before. retail sales rose three tenths of 1% last month, following a decline of the same amount in october. the pickup in november spending is a hopeful sign for an economy that many fear is slowing down. but retail experts say the trend can hardly be considered strong. >> it's muddling along. expectations were for 0.5% increase; it came in at 0.3% and that's off of a weak october. remember, october was quite weak. so, these are not robust numbers, they're not terrible numbers. it's a continuation of a sluggish consumer, that is still sluggish as the year wore on. >> susie: november sales were twice as strong if we don't include a big decline in spending at the pump. gas station sales posted their biggest drop in four years. instead of filling up, consumers bo
PBS
Dec 20, 2012 6:00pm PST
dismissed the focus on rice's remarks. gary ackerman of new york said congress has become a partisan bickering bunch of grousing old people. >> trying to quibble around here on this particular issue of the narrative rather than how we work together to make things better to quibble over somebody said a particular word or didn't use the right word, rather than figure out how to avoid the mistakes that might have been to not lose american lives on into the future. >> reporter: amid the furor, ambassador rice has withdrawn herself for consideration as secretary of state. and four state department security officials resigned on wednesday. >> suarez: retailers are hoping to finish the holiday shopping season strong, particularly given some forecasts warning of a slowing economy in 2013. as we reported earlier, consumer spending helped spike better growth this fall. but in light of the last recession, some are asking whether less personal debt and perhaps some more austerity might be a better approach. "newshour" economics correspondent paul solman has been exploring that question. part of
PBS
Dec 14, 2012 6:00pm PST
has been provided by: >> bnsf. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a gunman at a school, mass casualties, and emergency crews-- the scene was eerily familiar and, once again, horrifying. this time, tragedy struck at a grade school in a small connecticut town. 20 of the 27 dead are children. we begin our coverage with president obama's emotional address to the nation this afternoon. >> we've endured too many of these tragedies in the past few years. and each time i learn the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overw
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 12:00am PST
1812. his 200th birthday is being celebrated including at new york's morgan library. >> on assignment for charlie rose at new york's museum of library and museum. peepierpont morgan was an averae collector of dickens. the museum holds the largest collection in america. we are joined by dr. the curator and department head of literacy and historical manuscripts at the morgan library. >> here we are in mr. morgan's study. we're looking at the first installments of david copperfield. one schilling would have got you your monthly part. and here is the beginning part of the booklets and it is just page after page after page of advertisements for books and pills and remedies and all kinds of things. here you have the original illustrations that accompany each part separated by tissue, of course, so they didn't smudge each other. here's the very first page of the narrative, whether i turn out to be the hero of my own life or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. >> people buy a dickens' novel they imagine of course that that's how they were written. but the
PBS
Dec 31, 2012 3:00pm PST
the country, a new book about it debuted at number two sunday on the "new york times" list of the best- selling e-books. margaret warner sat down with the authors a few days ago. . >> warner: if barack obama's 2008 k578 pain road on on a message of hope and change this year's campaign against mitt romney was pore like a long slog. now less than six weeks after the election, more than a month before inauguration, two journalists at "politico" have published an ebook about the campaign focusing especially on the final 34 days. the end of the line, available only on-line is the last in their series of four ebooks on the 2012 contest. the authors are senior reporters jonathan martin and glenn thrush and they join me now. congratulation, gentlemen, on your book. >> thank you very much for having us. >> warner: let's just set the context for a minute. if you go back to say mid 2011, the conventional wisdom was president obama would have a very hard time given how bad the economy was, given how high unemployment was. what was your conclusion based on this reporting, about whether he and
PBS
Dec 19, 2012 12:00pm PST
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin tonight with an assessment of the u.s. and global economy, all eyes remain on efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff deadline on january 1st, when automatic spending cuts and tax increases are set to take hold. there is growing optimism on capitol hill that a deal could come soon, yesterday president obama said he would be willing to lower his revenue goal and tax increases at 400,000 instead of 250,000 per household. >> john boehner said he developed a backup plan to avert year-end tax increases if the negotiations with president obama stalls, this occurs in the backdrop of an economic that is bettering on housing and employment data, the global economy continues fragile with the european debt crisis and china i in in. >> rogoff is a professor of public policy and economics at harvard, he is a coauthor of the best selling book, this time is different, eight centuries of financial folly, many consider it to be the authoritative text on the impact of financial crisis around the world. i am pleased to have
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 7:30pm PST
that have recognized same-sex marriage, massachusetts, new york, et cetera. the prop 8 case affects people only in california. so if you add up the people in those other eight or nine states -- i'm not sure if that's more than california -- probably, because new york is one of them. if they were to take the prop 8 case, and as scott mentioned earlier, if they were to rule on the big question of whether there is a right to same-sex marriage and struck prop 8 down on the same broad grounds, not that the ninth circuit did but district judge vaughn walker did here in san francisco, that would be the biggest ruling of all. that would have the biggest implication of all. >> because then you would have same-sex marriage in mississippi. it seems like the least likely place to have it, but then it would be a national rule. >> the court may not be ready to take that step against a backdrop where we have nine or ten states that have recognized same-sex marriage but that still comprise a pretty small geographic and even numerical minority. and you may not be able to count california as a true s
PBS
Dec 20, 2012 12:00pm PST
studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate about whether the u.k. should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city f
PBS
Dec 10, 2012 6:00pm PST
reports on the polluted waters that spilled into new york homes and businesses in superstorm sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a lot of nasty stuff hanging about. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan has an update on the dangerous working conditions in bangladesh, where more than 100 workers have died over the past month. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama made another foray outside washington today, trying to buil
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